Risk Management Tools & Resources

 


Addressing Potential Maltreatment in Pediatric Patients

pediatrics-maltreatment-abuse

Laura M. Cascella, MA, CPHRM

Child abuse is an abhorrent, but not uncommon, problem in society. Stories abound in the media about children who have suffered maltreatment at the hands of parents, family members, caregivers, or strangers. Maltreatment might involve physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional/psychological abuse, or neglect — and children often are victims of more than one type of abuse.

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Understanding Informed Consent for Pediatric Patients

informed-consent-pediatrics

Laura M. Cascella, MA, CPHRM

Informed consent is a pillar of patient engagement and patient-centered care. It helps patients gain a full understanding of the benefits and risks of proposed procedures and treatments, thus allowing them to make educated decisions. But what happens when patients are infants, children, or adolescents?

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Speaking Up for Patient Safety: Techniques to Support Assertiveness

speaking-up-for-patient-safety

Laura M. Cascella, MA, CPHRM

Speaking up about risks, concerns, and errors in patient care is crucial for patient safety. Although voicing concerns may seem like a reflexive response for healthcare providers and staff, barriers can prevent it from happening. Fear, intimidation, lack of confidence, power differentials, and other factors can thwart individuals’ efforts to assert concerns. These issues can permeate healthcare organizations that permit or do not constructively address disruptive behavior, bullying, workplace incivility, retaliation, and blame.

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Breaking Down Communication Barriers in Collaborative and Team-Based Care

communication-barriers-collaborative-care

Laura M. Cascella, MA, CPHRM

Successful communication among healthcare providers has long been a critical element of patient safety. Yet, in recent years, the importance of good communication has become even more pivotal with the growing emphasis on collaborative and team-based care. As healthcare delivery has evolved and caring for the patient population has become more complicated, the paradigm of the solo practitioner has given way to more complex healthcare systems and multidisciplinary teams that include doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurse anesthetists, surgeon assistants, clinical nurse specialists, and other clinical and nonclinical roles.

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Confronting Implicit Bias in Healthcare: Strategies for Clinicians

confronting-implicit-bias-in-healthcare-clinicians

Laura M. Cascella, MA, CPHRM

Efforts to reduce bias in healthcare have received increasing attention in recent years as the industry confronts issues associated with health equity, diversity, inclusivity, and health disparities. Bias is recognized as a significant barrier to achieving equitable and culturally competent care; yet, identifying and remediating this problem is complex.

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Risk Perspectives in Telehealth: Informed Consent

Technological advancements in healthcare have helped improve access to, options for, and convenience of care. Healthcare delivered via telecommunication technology (telehealth), has become an increasingly popular and viable option for patients, particularly as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet, even with these advancements, certain aspects of traditional medical care remain vital, including informed consent.

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Risk Perspectives in Telehealth: Privacy and Security

The rapid expansion of technology in healthcare has significant implications for privacy and security of patients’ protected health information (PHI). Confidential or sensitive information that is stored or sent electronically creates a host of security issues that healthcare organizations must consider. For example, mobile devices can be easily lost or stolen, unintentional data breaches can occur, and cyberattacks can cripple information technology systems.

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Risk Perspectives in Telehealth: Online Prescribing

An important aspect in the provision of care via telehealth is abiding by appropriate standards of care and scopes of practice, which are defined by federal and state laws, professional boards, accrediting agencies, specialty associations, payers, and so forth. Prescribing medications to patients as part of telehealth services — online prescribing — falls into the parameters of “standards and scope,” and healthcare providers must take precautions to ensure they are prescribing within legal and professional boundaries.

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